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Why Won’t They Hire You?

You applied, they responded and you nailed the interview. And then… nothing.

Broadcast media job searching can be exasperating. Consider these tips to keep yourself in a state of zen until you land that gig.

Ask every future question now. Imagine it is 30 days after the interview. You have heard nothing. What questions will you have then?

  • When will you make a decision?
  • Who is involved in the decision process?
  • Do you have any reservations about me in this position?
  • How does my experience compare to others?
  • What have you heard about me?
  • Am I in the running?

Ask those questions during the interview. You will ruminate on it less later.

Hiring always takes too long. Think of major decisions like buying your car or home. Then imagine going through that process with a whole committee of decision-makers who have a say-so on top of your own criteria. Hiring is even more grueling than that.

A supposedly green-lighted position can go unfilled for months. Understaffed corporate lawyers can take weeks to write a basic employment contract. Talent agents sometimes do not return calls when we want to hire.  Whatever hiring time frame they tell you, triple it.

You may not be not their person. I was elated when my audition to host a weekly TV show was ranked the best. Then the director hired the second-place guy because he brought potential promotion tie-ins. I admit to feeling gratification when the show was quickly canceled. Companies sometimes hire poorly. It is not about you.

They may not be not your people. I interviewed for a major program director job and was told to expect final talks soon. Then… silence. They ghosted me for a month, so I signed a contract extension where I was.

Then they called and wanted to talk. I said no. Remember that how company behaves in the hiring process is a nice version of how they operate day to day.

Check your own references. A talented host who could not find work called me for the truth; “Is my reputation that bad?” she asked. I took a breath and said, “Yes, it is.”

I shared that I had seen her name dismissed from multiple job opportunities because of previous drama. We discussed ways for her to address negatives straight-on in interviews with steps she had taken to behave more professionally.  Ask people who know what is really being said about you, then work with that.

Let it go. Remember that everyone you meet with will pick up on your physical, mental and spiritual state. Keep in good condition.  Exercise, meditate, sleep, eat healthy, limit alcohol/marijuana and sleep well. Stop checking your email every three minutes to see if a job responded.

When the time is right you will hear from the right person with the right job.